oldimperial Chris

Start of new project – Bolton No7 Horizontal Mill Engine

A lot of time working out a materials list is always worthwhile especially as some components can be made from existing bits and pieces. The cost of new materials can be quite high, so a good rummage around can save a bit. The material I have had to order came in at a touch over $200, the dearest piece of steel was 4″ dia x 10″ long at $70.

For this project I have chosen not to use castings (far to expensive!) instead fabrication is the go here as seen above, and when its all prettied up and painted, no one will ever know.

My Models (so far)

Traction Engine built from scratch no drawings as such, just made it up as I went along.
One inch bore, one inch stroke, 80 psi from a LPG burner under the boiler and it pulls me about on a little trolley. How good is that
The pressure gauge is off an old compressor, initially it was much closer to the boiler and it got too much heat and blew apart
the soft soldering inside – oh what fun that was!
bits of old bicycle and old lathe change gears for the final drive
No water pump or reversing gear – yet!!
My O.B. Bolton No 12 Beam Engine. This I did have a set of drawings for.
Flywheel needs to be remade at some point, the one here is a re-engineered cast iron wheel from an old wheelbarrow ( 7 spokes!)
A nearly completed Triple Expansion Marine engine, again some bits are of my own design, namely the drain valve set up from the
tops and bottoms of the cylinders
The steel barrel next to the water and air pumps will be the condenser unit, I think the big copper pipe at the top for the exhaust feed to the condenser is a wee bit big? I will use smaller tube I think
Nice view of the crank and con rods

Triple Expansion Marine Engine

My profile photo is of a nearly complete marine engine, taken about a year so far. Built from scratch from scavenged bits and bobs, had to buy a few things like nuts and bolts and pipe fittings. hope to run on steam someday, but for now it’s compressed air or demo running with the little electric motor. Jobs to do are the steam condenser, water and air pumps a final touch up of polish and paint, then move on to the next time consuming project (maybe a horizontal mill engine).

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Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

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The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

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  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.